Feb 15 2012
Drucker Business Forum: Rick Wartzman What Would Drucker Do Now?
 

Drucker Business Forum: Rick Wartzman What Would Drucker Do Now?

Thursday, February 23, 2012 from 7:45 AM to 9:30 AM (PT)

Pasadena, CA

What Would Drucker Do Now?

Rick Wartzman

In conversation with Russ Stanton

Rick Wartzman is the executive director of the Drucker Institute at Claremont Graduate University. The institute’s mission is to better society by stimulating effective management and responsible leadership. It does this, in large part, by advancing the teachings of the late Peter F. Drucker, “the man who invented management” (in the words of BusinessWeek magazine).


 

Thursday, February 23rd, 2012

Continental Breakfast & Networking: 7:45-8:30 a.m.

Forum: 8:30-9:30 a.m. 

Admission is FREE, but RSVPs are required.

KPCC’s Crawford Family Forum

474 South Raymond Avenue

Pasadena, California 91105


 

Rick Wartzman is the executive director of the Drucker Institute at Claremont Graduate University. The institute’s mission is to better society by stimulating effective management and responsible leadership. It does this, in large part, by advancing the teachings of the late Peter F. Drucker, “the man who invented management” (in the words of BusinessWeek magazine).

In addition to his duties at the Drucker Institute, Wartzman writes “The Drucker Difference” column for Bloomberg Businessweek online. A collection of his columns, What Would Drucker Do Now?, was published by McGraw-Hill in 2011. He’s also the editor of The Drucker Lectures: Essential Lessons on Management, Society, and Economy, published by McGraw-Hill in 2010.

Before joining the institute, Wartzman worked for two decades in newspapers. He began his career at the Wall Street Journal, where he served in a variety of positions, including White House correspondent and founding editor of the paper’s weekly California section. He joined the Los Angeles Times in 2002 as business editor and, in that role, helped shape “The Wal-Mart Effect,” which won the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting. Wartzman later became editor of the newspaper’s Sunday magazine, West.

Wartzman’s book, Obscene in the Extreme: The Burning and Banning of John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath, was published by PublicAffairs in 2008. It was one of the Los Angeles Times‘ 25 favorite nonfiction books of the year, as well as a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize in history and a PEN USA Literary Award. Wartzman is the co-author, with Mark Arax, of the best-seller The King of California: J.G. Boswell and the Making of a Secret American Empire, which was selected as one of the 10 best books of 2003 by the San Francisco Chronicle and one of the 10 best nonfiction books of the year by the Los Angeles Times. It also won, among other honors, a California Book Award and the William Saroyan International Prize for Writing.

Russ Stanton is the vice president of content for Southern California Public Radio, where he oversees its award-winning newsroom, which produces programming for 89.3 KPCC-FM in Los Angeles and Orange Counties, 891. KUOR-FM in the Inland Empire, 90.3 KVLA-FM in the Coachella Vallley, and for www.KPCC.org.

Before joining SCPR this year, Stanton was the editor of the Los Angeles Times from 2008 to 2011, capping a 30-year career in newspapers. At the Times, he led a rapid expansion of its online news reporting and the restructuring and integration of its Internet operation with the print newsroom.

 

During his tenure as editor, the Times won three Pulitzer Prizes, including the Gold Medal for Public Service for coverage of the financial scandal in the city of Bell, and was a finalist six other times.

The Drucker Business Forum is produced by the Peter F. Drucker and Masatoshi Ito Graduate School of Management at Claremont Graduate University.The series is co-presented by KPCC.

Share
FTC - Site employs income earning affiliate linking

Written by

View all posts by: